Everything Amazon Products

Amazon Prime membership in Australia, Canada, Germany, the United Kingdom, India and the United States also provides Amazon Video,[8] the instant streaming of selected films and TV programs at no additional cost.[9] In November 2011, it was announced that Prime members had access to the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library, which allows users to borrow up to one a month of specified popular Kindle e-books.[10] People with an email address at an academic domain such as .edu or .ac.uk, typically students, are eligible for Prime Student privileges, including discounts on Prime membership.[11]
Promising review: "I love these pads. They are magnetic so they easily stick to the fridge. The items listed are the items that you use most often, and it is organized into sections that correspond to aisles at most grocery stores. Each section has a few additional blanks for adding those items that it doesn't list. This thing saves me a bunch of time!" —Steven Dix

European regulators are closely watching how Amazon uses its own sales data to potentially gain an unfair advantage over marketplace sellers. Margrethe Vestager, the EU commissioner for competition, recently said that, while there are no accusations against Amazon at this point, her department has started a "preliminary investigation" into how the company may be copying best-selling products by competitors.
Prime Wardrobe lets you try on and purchase new styles with little hassle. Choose three or more items across the women's, men's, children's, and baby clothes, shoes, and accessories categories. Then, you'll have seven days to try them at home and decide what you want to keep. Check out online, then return your unwanted items for free using the resealable box and prepaid shipping label.
If fighting over the last hot tech item in stock or waiting in hour-long check-out lines sounds like your worst nightmare, buying directly from Amazon is your best bet. And if you’re not already a Prime member (which gets you free, two-day shipping on pretty much everything you could ever need), we recommend it — especially if you’re not a plan-ahead kind of shopper.
Like Me is an indictment of a life spent “extremely” online: a thriller in which the thrill is the threat of empty transgression; a body horror flick in which the body horror is the way social media and Tumblr and Reddit and YouTube transform us, make us grotesque, perverting basic physical functions into scary, dysmorphic representations of the flesh sacks we carry around with us whenever we’re not online. Early in the film, writer-director Robert Mockler introduces us to the online world of our main character, Kiya (Addison Timlin, terrifying), via a disturbing barrage of hyperreal, gif-like images—close-ups of sugary cereal and milk chewed sloppily, of a viscous tongue mid-slurp, of Kiya doing weird kinesthetics in a dirty motel room while the camera capsizes and arises around her, this Manic Pixie Dream Girl who embodies each of those words as literally as possible. Though Mockler implies that these are all curated posts Kiya’s put online, we believe that this is how she sees the world. Aided by some seriously heady opioids and hallucinogens, she can’t help but digest her lived experiences without mitigating them digitally. As Kiya moves through Mockler’s pink-ish, neon dystopia, DP James Siewert shooting Timlin as if she’s stranded in the middle of a Michael Mann joint, everything seems on the table. Kiya lures a motel manager, Marshall (Larry Fessenden, better than excellent), to her room—another room, another motel, somewhere on this stupid planet—with the possibility of sex. Instead, he finds Kiya’s redecorated her room like an outtake from The Cell, testing the lonely guy’s willingness to go along with whatever insanity’s in store. Of course, some icky gastrointestinal calamity occurs, but Marshall never flinches, so Kiya kidnaps him and takes him with her. Gorgeous and gross in equal measure, Like Me is a visual feast. Mockler conjures setpieces out of practically nothing, crafting each frame with a meticulous symmetry that belies the chaos at the heart of Kiya’s impulsive odyssey. —Dom Sinacola
Amazon has significantly increased the number of private-label brands in recent years, and currently has over 120 of them, according to a new report published by TJI Research last week. That's more than a nine-fold increase since early 2016, SunTrust Robinson Humphrey wrote in a note in June. The firm expects Amazon's private-label business to generate $7.5 billion in sales in 2018 and $25 billion by 2022.

Amazon also created "channels" to benefit certain causes. In 2004, Amazon allowed customers to donate $5 to $200 to the campaigns of 2004 US presidential hopefuls, providing links that raised $300,000 for the candidates.[100] Amazon has periodically reactivated a Red Cross donation channel after crises such as Hurricane Sandy, Hurricane Katrina, and the 2004 earthquake and tsunami in the Indian Ocean. By January 2005, nearly 200,000 people had donated over $15.7 million in the US.[101]


Prime Music is a Spotify/Google Play Music competitor that offer a library of millions of songs to Amazon Prime members at no added cost. Amazon Prime members can stream and download music for free. Prime has a collection of over 2 million songs available for download without advertisements. Consumers who need a larger music library can subscribe to Amazon Music Unlimited with over 10 million songs for $7.99 and $9.99 for non-Prime members.
Membership Sharing: Two adults living in the same household can create an Amazon Household to share certain Amazon Prime benefits. For more information, go to About Amazon Households. If you have a paid Prime membership under your personal account you can share your shipping benefits with your Amazon Business user account. Go to Amazon Prime and Business Accounts.
The biggest thing that Amazon has to offer in November is intriguing new series, Homecoming. Homecoming comes from Mr. Robot creator Sam Esmail, stars Julia Roberts, and is based on a podcast. That's quite the trifecta of Interesting Things (TM). Other new Amazon original series include the less hyped but equally interesting Mirzapur, Inside Joke, and Patriot Season 2.
Society is perhaps what you would have ended up with in the earlier ’80s if David Cronenberg had a more robust sense of humor. Rather, this bizarre deconstruction of Reagan-era yuppiehood came from Brian Yuzna, well-known to horror fans for his partnership with Stuart Gordon, which produced the likes of Re-Animator and From Beyond…and eventually Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, believe it or not. Society is a weird film on every level, a feverish descent into what may or may not be paranoia when a popular high school guy begins questioning whether his family members (and indeed, the entire town) are involved in some sinister, sexual, exceedingly icky business. Plot takes a backseat to dark comedy and a creepily foreboding sense that we’re building to a revelatory conclusion, which absolutely does not disappoint. The effects work, suffice it to say, produces some of the most batshit crazy visuals in the history of film—there are disgusting sights here that you won’t see anywhere else, outside of perhaps an early Peter Jackson movie, a la Dead Alive. But Society’s ambitions are considerably grander than that Jackson’s gross-out classic: It takes aim at its own title and the tendency of insular communities to prey upon the outside world to create social satire of the highest (and grossest) order. —Jim Vorel
We present these figures with the caution that no research firm truly knows how much clothing and footwear is sold on Amazon. We also note that some research firms have enjoyed substantial media coverage on the back of estimates that have placed Amazon as one of the very largest retailers of apparel in the US. We further note the risk of a herding effect, whereby some research firms may be reluctant to estimate figures that vary susbtantially from those published by other firms and that are already in the public domain.
"These are by far the cheapest blue-light-blocking glasses that I've found, and they work really well. I was having headaches nearly every day of my last semester of college from working full-time and taking night classes — both of which relied heavily upon screens. These were truly lifesavers, and I've rarely gotten so much use out of $9. I've written a review of them before, and I'm wearing them now." — Mara Leighton
I own about 100 SD cards and I always do a speed test to verify the reading and writing speeds before I install the memory. This card checked out extremely well. The fastest write speed on this card was 73.143 MB/Sec and the fastest reading speed was 93.368 MB/Sec. I have attached the graphical test data for your information. I used a USB 3.0 port with a USB 3.0 card reader for the test.
They say, don't judge a book by its cover. Good tip for this one, because the cover promises this is a book about "Why we buy" and "the science of shopping" and that it has information about online shopping as well. The reality? This is more like "Feng Shui for Retail Stores" with basically all of the book being anecdotes about shops that had inappropriate arrangements of merchandise that kept people from buying as much as they might have. The lone chapter about the internet is a joke -- it's basically just the author complaining that he doesn't understand why anyone shops online, and offering a couple of very specific suggestions for how sites like Amazon and Apple Store can improve. No help at all if you are running anything but a physical retail shopping business.

The feature functions similarly to Pinterest’s Lens visual search tool. In the video demo above, you can see Snapchat identifying Under Armour’s HOVR shoe (amongst all its other models), and the barcode for CoverGirl’s clean matte liquid makeup. That matches our scoop based on code dug out of Snapchat’s Android app by TechCrunch tipster Ishan Agarwal. Snapchat’s shares popped three percent the day we published that scoop, and again this morning before falling back to half that gain.
You are being directed to ZacksTrade, a division of LBMZ Securities and licensed broker-dealer. ZacksTrade and Zacks.com are separate companies. The web link between the two companies is not a solicitation or offer to invest in a particular security or type of security. ZacksTrade does not endorse or adopt any particular investment strategy, any analyst opinion/rating/report or any approach to evaluating indiv idual securities.
Woot.com is operated by Woot Services LLC. Products on Woot.com are sold by Woot, Inc., other than items on Gourmet.Woot which are sold by the seller specified on the product detail page. Product narratives are for entertainment purposes and frequently employ literary point of view; the narratives do not express Woot's editorial opinion. Aside from literary abuse, your use of this site also subjects you to Woot's terms of use and privacy policy. Woot may designate a user comment as a Quality Post, but that doesn't mean we agree with or guarantee anything said or linked to in that post.

2GB Plan: No discounts apply (except AutoPay discounts). Includes unlimited domestic Long Distance calling and texting. Third-party content/downloads are add’l charge. Includes selected allotment of on-network data usage for phone and mobile hotspot use and 100MB off-network data usage. Add’l on-network high-speed data allowance may be purchased at $15/GB. Mobile Hotspot Usage pulls from your data and off-network allowances. High-speed data is access to 3G/4G. Add’l $25 line/mo. applies with subsidized phone until the customer enters into a new device transaction that does not have an annual term service agreement.
Prime Pantry: Prime Pantry gives members access to low-priced groceries as well as household and pet care items. Now a subscription service, Prime Pantry costs $4.99/month (in addition to your Prime membership). The service includes unlimited free shipping on Pantry orders of $40 or more. Orders under $40 incur a $7.99 shipping fee. Prime Pantry orders cannot be shipped to addresses in Alaska, Hawaii or Puerto Rico.
Promising review: "I love these pads. They are magnetic so they easily stick to the fridge. The items listed are the items that you use most often, and it is organized into sections that correspond to aisles at most grocery stores. Each section has a few additional blanks for adding those items that it doesn't list. This thing saves me a bunch of time!" —Steven Dix
Prime Pantry: Prime members in select regions can pay an additional monthly membership fee to receive FREE shipping on all Prime Pantry orders of $40 or more, or pay a flat shipping fee for each order they place under $40. Prime Pantry orders cannot be shipped to addresses in Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. For more information, go to About Prime Pantry.

Yes. Amazon Prime can be added to multiple lines on your account. For every account that you add it to, you will be charged $12.99/month, excludes taxes and surcharges. You can also create an Amazon Household, which allows you to easily share Books, audiobooks, apps and games with your family using Family Library and manage profiles of children in the Household. Setting up a Household also allows Prime members to share select benefits of Prime with another adult. For more information, go to About Amazon Households.
In April, Bezos announced that Prime membership had exceeded 100 million paid members worldwide. Bezos unveiled the figure in his annual shareholder letter — published since 1997 and widely considered a must-read among executives and business leaders around the globe — and noted that in 2017, Prime gained more new members than in any previous year. By comparison, Netflix at the time had 125 million subscribers.
However, once he runs out of facts a couple of chapters into the book, Underhill pads the rest of the book out with opinions, and this is where the problems begin. While he may be an excellent observer, Underhill is a poor business analyst. He doesn't understand the dynamics of many of the businesses he comments on. Many of his suggestions are embarassingly ignorant of the realities behind the businesses he discuss, or, worse, suggest--as if he invented the concepts-- that companies should do things that they have already been doing for years.

“I think, effectively, you have a company that has conspired with about a billion consumers and technology to destroy brands,” argued Scott Galloway, a founder of business research firm now called Gartner L2 and a professor of marketing at New York University Stern School of Business, in a presentation last year. “Their attitude is that brands have, for a long time, earned an unearned price premium that screws consumers.”
Social commerce is heating up as Instagram launches Shopping tags in Stories and a dedicated Shopping channel in Explore, while Pinterest opens up Shop the Look pins and hits 250 million monthly users. The feature should mesh well with Snap’s young and culture-obsessed audience. In the U.S., its users are 20 percent more likely to have made a mobile purchase than non-users, and 60 percent more likely to make impulse purchases according to studies by Murphy Research and GfK.
Beginning with cinema’s most obvious dick joke and ending on the its two directors burning everything, including its anti-hero, to the ground, the sequel to Crank is as much of a mindfuck as its predecessor, but beholden to absolutely nothing but the unfiltered expunging of their most loathsome impulses on behalf of directors Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor, two unrepentant dude-bros who, considering the movies they made together, seem to have parted ways, perhaps on bad terms or perhaps because the two grown men who made Gamer and Ghost Rider 2 just had nowhere left to go together. Like any good follow-up, Crank 2 is everything that Crank was, but launched irretrievably down a hellish K-hole, amping up all the public sex, murder, violence, gratuitous nudity, nihilism and genre-bending fuck-all spirit that made the first such a potential point of cult fascination. Here, Jason Statham’s Chev Chelios has transformed into full-on superhero—minus the “hero” connotation—an invulnerable, inhuman cyborg who must regularly pump enough electricity into his body to kill a herd of elephants just to keep his battery-powered heart beating as he chases after the Chinese mobsters who stole his original God-given ticker and (almost) the big ole monster between his legs. There is nothing subtle about Crank 2; there is only submission. —Dom Sinacola
They say, don't judge a book by its cover. Good tip for this one, because the cover promises this is a book about "Why we buy" and "the science of shopping" and that it has information about online shopping as well. The reality? This is more like "Feng Shui for Retail Stores" with basically all of the book being anecdotes about shops that had inappropriate arrangements of merchandise that kept people from buying as much as they might have. The lone chapter about the internet is a joke -- it's basically just the author complaining that he doesn't understand why anyone shops online, and offering a couple of very specific suggestions for how sites like Amazon and Apple Store can improve. No help at all if you are running anything but a physical retail shopping business.
The question at this point is valuation. At roughly 10x revenue and 63x forward EPS, ETSY isn’t cheap, even by the standards of high-margin platform stocks. As Josh Enomoto pointed out in August, the arts & crafts industry isn’t growing. Industry leader Michaels Companies (NASDAQ:MIK) has said the same thing — and it’s rolling out an Etsy competitor of its own next year.
For instance, Prime members who download the Whole Foods app can save up to 10 percent on select Whole Foods purchases just by scanning their smartphone at a Whole Foods register. Prime members also get discounts on digital services like FreeTime Unlimited, which costs $2.99/month for Prime members or $4.99/month for non-members. Throughout the year, Prime members also get exclusive discounts on Amazon hardware, which the online retailer recently refreshed.
A.: Amazon Prime Video is the streaming-video component of Amazon Prime. Like Netflix and Hulu, Amazon Prime offers unlimited streaming of tens of thousands of movies and TV shows. Unlike its two competitors, however, Amazon Prime also allows à la carte rentals and purchases of its content. You can also chose to subscribe to Prime Video only for $8.99/month.
The worst thing about Amazon's new releases for November 2018 is that they're not Amazon's new releases for October 2018. There's no way around it: October is the best time of year and Amazon realized that with a super sized list of new releases for the Halloween season. November is undoubtedly not hte same. That doesn't mean it has nothing to offer.
This new $24.99 product is exactly what the name suggests: it’s a plug that goes into an outlet and is compatible with Alexa. So you can tell Alexa to turn on or turn off whatever’s plugged into the Smart Plug from wherever you are. And it supports the automatic Wi-Fi setup mentioned above. Preorders kick off today, and the $24.99 Smart Plug will be available in October.
Just a few weeks earlier, The Capitol Forum, a Washington, D.C.-based news service that examines business and regulation, published a story arguing Amazon risked antitrust enforcement by the Trump administration for using its algorithms and platform to promote its own products over “those of merchants that are dependent on Amazon’s platform and with whom Amazon competes.”
Users can use Snapchat’s camera to scan a physical object or barcode, which brings up a card showing that item and similar ones along with their title, price, thumbnail image, average review score and Prime availability. When they tap on one, they’ll be sent to Amazon’s app or site to buy it. Snapchat determines if you’re scanning a song, QR Snapcode or object, and then Amazon’s machine vision tech recognizes logos, artwork, package covers or other unique identifying marks to find the product. It’s rolling out to a small percentage of U.S. users first before Snap considers other countries.
The main body of this report discusses our survey findings, question by question. We have also provided an appendix that aggregates various third-party research firms’ estimates of Amazon’s US apparel sales in order to give readers a more complete picture. First, though, we bring together data points from various questions in our survey as we discuss six major themes that emerged from our research.
"I'm very Type A, so I live my life according to the lists I write for myself. I decided I needed a weekly planner pad to set on my desk so that I could better plan out my week, and after much searching, I found this one by Hashi. It has the perfect amount of space for writing, cute designs on the pages, and it's not dated, so it can last beyond the calendar year." — Malarie Gokey

Promising review: "Bob Ross on socks? What more could a junior in high school want? My son is now the coolest kid to ever have walked his school's halls, and he does so in such style. The fit is perfect, not too tall and not too short when pulled up his calves while also wearing shorts and a T-shirt with every Bob Ross paint color listed, and he's 6'4". Told you he's cool. He's almost too cool for school. —Appollina
The main body of this report discusses our survey findings, question by question. We have also provided an appendix that aggregates various third-party research firms’ estimates of Amazon’s US apparel sales in order to give readers a more complete picture. First, though, we bring together data points from various questions in our survey as we discuss six major themes that emerged from our research.
Turn on 1-Click. Click the "Turn 1-Click on" button on the right side of the page. This will toggle the 1-Click settings for your account. You can now click the "1-Click Order" button on most items (including all digital items including all Amazon Kindle books and Kindle apps, etc, as well as Amazon Video (formerly called both Amazon Instant Video and Amazon Video-on-Demand)) to have them instantly ordered and shipped. You will have 30 minutes to cancel erroneous orders.

Amazon's answer to Apple Music, Spotify and the like gives you access to "tens of millions" of songs -- far more than you get from Prime Music. If you already have a Prime subscription, Music Unlimited costs $7.99 per month -- a few dollars less than the competition charges. However, a family plan makes it $14.99 per month whether you're a Prime subscriber or not, and that doesn't represent any savings over the competition. Indeed, you might want to investigate whether Amazon Music Unlimited is good deal for you before adding it to your account.
Indeed, Amazon casts a long shadow over a number of industries. Grocery stocks plunged when the company acquired Whole Foods Market last year. Walgreens (NASDAQ:WBA) and CVS Health (NYSE:CVS) fell when the company acquired PillPack this summer, and an eventual entry by Amazon into the pharmacy space still hangs over the sector. The 2016 launch of Amazon Prints sent Shutterfly (NASDAQ:SFLY) down 12%.
In 2012, Amazon announced the launch of Vine.com for buying green products, including groceries, household items, and apparel.[2] It is part of Quidsi, the company that Amazon bought in 2010 that also runs the sites Diapers.com (baby), Wag.com (pets), and YoYo.com (toys).[2] Amazon also owns other e-commerce sites like Shopbop.com, Woot.com, and Zappos.com.[2]
×