Everything Amazon Products

Social commerce is heating up as Instagram launches Shopping tags in Stories and a dedicated Shopping channel in Explore, while Pinterest opens up Shop the Look pins and hits 250 million monthly users. The feature should mesh well with Snap’s young and culture-obsessed audience. In the U.S., its users are 20 percent more likely to have made a mobile purchase than non-users, and 60 percent more likely to make impulse purchases according to studies by Murphy Research and GfK.
Lease (Sprint Flex): Mo. amount excl. tax. Terms for all other customers will vary including amount due at signing & taxes/fees. Req. qualifying device & svc. plan. No equipment security deposit req. Upon completion of 18-mo. term, customer can continue to pay mo. lease amount, purch. or return device. Customer is responsible for insurance & repairs. Early termination of lease/svc.: Remaining lease pymt. will be due immed. & req. device return or pymt. of purch. option device price in lease.
Visit www.sprint.com/amazonprime, call 1-(800)-SPRINT1 or go to your nearest Sprint store. After adding Prime to your Sprint account, you will get a text message with an activation link, where you can complete the registration process. Once you have successfully activated your Prime membership, you can immediately start enjoying all the benefits of Prime. To enhance your Prime experience, you will also be prompted to download the Amazon apps which will allow you to get Prime content on your phone.
Amazon’s launch of several apparel private labels over the last couple of years is one sign that it is serious about growing its share of the fashion market. Our survey found that a significant number of Amazon Fashion shoppers have already bought something from one of its still-new private-label ranges and that even more shoppers are interested in trying those ranges:
What’s perhaps most refreshing in Green Room is writer-director Jeremy Saulnier’s lack of interest in the kind of moralizing that made his last film, Blue Ruin, ultimately seem conventional. Instead, Saulnier simply presents us this nutty scenario without feeling the need to lard it up with anything as cumbersome as topical commentary or moral ambiguity. He proceeds to wring as much tension and suspense from its pulpy retro plot as possible, adding a few entertaining grace notes along the way, which can best be seen in its performances. In the ensemble-based Green Room, Saulnier revels in the contrasts of personalities and styles: band bassist Pat’s (Anton Yelchin) Bill Paxton-like desperation, for instance, set alongside the weary, near-drugged-out deadpan of Amber (Imogen Poots), a friend of the woman whose murder sets off the film’s violent chain of events; or the imperial calm of Darcy (Patrick Stewart), the ruthless leader of the band of white supremacists who attempt to kill Pat, Amber and the rest. It’d be a stretch to call these characters three-dimensional, but nevertheless, under Saulnier’s writing and direction, they all manage to stand out just enough as individuals for us to become emotionally involved in their fates. Meanwhile, Saulnier supports these characters and plot turns with filmmaking that is remarkable for its economy and patience. D.P. Sean Porter gets a lot of mileage out of the cramped quarters and grimy lighting of the bar, lending its wide (2.35:1) frames an appropriately nightmarish feel amidst many suspenseful set pieces. In those ways, the lean, mean Green Room stands as one of the best B-movie genre exercises in many years. —Kenji Fujishima
Promising review: "Bob Ross on socks? What more could a junior in high school want? My son is now the coolest kid to ever have walked his school's halls, and he does so in such style. The fit is perfect, not too tall and not too short when pulled up his calves while also wearing shorts and a T-shirt with every Bob Ross paint color listed, and he's 6'4". Told you he's cool. He's almost too cool for school. —Appollina

Weinswig further remarks, “Amazon has strengthened its North America revenue growth even in the face of much slower Prime membership expansion, as recorded by Prosper. This comes despite Prime driving Amazon’s sales, and it implies that each Prime customer is becoming increasingly valuable to Amazon. We’ll be watching closely to see whether the recently recorded leveling-off in membership rates feeds through to a slowing of Amazon’s progress in the US.”


It’s not difficult to imagine a different cut of Anna Rose Holmer’s The Fits that hews closer to the arc of a traditional sports story. Hers has the makings of a familiar one, of a misfit who wants more than anything to compete—but unlike most stories of inspirational audacity, The Fits is as much about discomfort as the catharsis that comes with achievement. In it, Toni (Royalty Hightower) is an 11-year-old who has more experience with stereotypically male pursuits like lifting weights and punching speed bags than the usual interests of a pre-teen girl. She spends nearly all of her time at the Lincoln Recreation Center alongside her boxer brother, Jermaine (Da’Sean Minor), pushing her body to the limit. While she shows a remarkable aptitude for the ascetical devotion required for boxing, she still dreams about competing on the dance team, “The Lincoln Lionesses.” Framed with a rigid sense of space by cinematographer Paul Yee, and backed by the groaning score from veteran composers Danny Bensi and Saunder Jurriaans, The Fits is infused with such dread that one can’t help but imagine that characters’ muscles and bones could break or shatter at any moment. The film’s most explicit example of which may be Toni pulling off a temporary tattoo, but The Fits is firmly a story of metaphysical body horror, an allegory about our greatest fears of physical fragility shot brilliantly through a feminist lens. With that, the film manages to reinvent the sports story as something both brainy and physically pure. —Michael Snydel

They say, don't judge a book by its cover. Good tip for this one, because the cover promises this is a book about "Why we buy" and "the science of shopping" and that it has information about online shopping as well. The reality? This is more like "Feng Shui for Retail Stores" with basically all of the book being anecdotes about shops that had inappropriate arrangements of merchandise that kept people from buying as much as they might have. The lone chapter about the internet is a joke -- it's basically just the author complaining that he doesn't understand why anyone shops online, and offering a couple of very specific suggestions for how sites like Amazon and Apple Store can improve. No help at all if you are running anything but a physical retail shopping business.
Here, too, valuation is a concern. Any Amazon-proof stocks are going to be dearly valued. And for investors looking for value, LULU isn’t one of the best stocks to buy in retail. But a pullback has made valuation more palatable, and any concerns about the ‘athleisure’ trend fading appear assuaged. LULU is priced like a growth stock, but it very well may be poised to drive that kind of growth.
The new feature illustrates the growing tension between Amazon and the many big and small brands that have become reliant on the site because of its dominance in e-commerce. Amazon is becoming a direct competitor for more sellers, raising questions around how the company's use of its marketplace sales data could potentially give it an unfair advantage over other brands and merchants.
"I get asked about this water bottle all of the time. I use it at the office, at the gym, and at home. It helps keep me honest about how much water I'm drinking and it's helped me stay more hydrated because of the time marker. I also love the spout, the attached wrist strap, the closure on the bottle (this thing will not leak) and the opacity of the bottle. One of the best purchases I've made in a while." — Melanie Winer
This new $24.99 product is exactly what the name suggests: it’s a plug that goes into an outlet and is compatible with Alexa. So you can tell Alexa to turn on or turn off whatever’s plugged into the Smart Plug from wherever you are. And it supports the automatic Wi-Fi setup mentioned above. Preorders kick off today, and the $24.99 Smart Plug will be available in October.
Ai is not a man you can easily cow. If you’ve read about his trials in China, or watched Alison Klayman’s excellent 2012 documentary Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, then you know this well enough. But watching his mettle in action in Human Flow inspires a different reaction than it does in Never Sorry. Rather than admire his boldness, we’re invited to search out that boldness in ourselves. The problem that Human Flow documents is massive and gaining in scope, chronicled first as a trickle, then a stream, then a torrent, now a deluge—soon a tsunami. The crisis of our refugees all over the world isn’t a problem one fixes merely by, for instance, banging away at a keyboard or saying pretty things in public spaces. Instead, the problem requires action, and Human Flow, generously taken at face value, is a tribute to those in the trenches: relief workers, volunteers, doctors, academics and lawmakers fighting to give refugees fleeing disease, famine and violence unimaginable to many of us the respect and protection they deserve. In turn, the film asks the audience to what lengths they would go to safeguard innocent people from harm, to give them opportunities to make their lives better. Ai has no vanity; he does not position himself as the hero. Through his devotion to his subjects, Human Flow reminds us how much work it is to help the helpless. The tragic conclusion is that we’re not doing enough. —Andy Crump

From the opening of a brand new vinyl record to the hidden tracks on your favorite CDs, the melodies and beats of your favorite tunes can soothe, energize, create whole new memories, and even transform your entire mood. That’s why Amazon.com brings you all the very best in the music you’ll love, whether you’re looking for digital MP3s, vinyl, CDs, or other formats.

Andrew began his first importing business in 2005 at 19. Graduating as a double major with High Distinction from the Carlson School at 20, Andrew now owns and operates four businesses related to manufacturing, importing, private labeling, wholesale distribution, retail sales and third party marketplaces. His lifetime sales on eBay and Amazon are each in the 8 figures. His latest startup is AMZ Help, which offers unlimited Amazon consulting from a team of experts for a monthly fee. Now 31, he lives in Hidden Hills Preserve with his wife and two young children.
The biggest thing that Amazon has to offer in November is intriguing new series, Homecoming. Homecoming comes from Mr. Robot creator Sam Esmail, stars Julia Roberts, and is based on a podcast. That's quite the trifecta of Interesting Things (TM). Other new Amazon original series include the less hyped but equally interesting Mirzapur, Inside Joke, and Patriot Season 2.
Euromonitor International estimates that Amazon US sold $24.6 billion of clothing and footwear in 2017, of which $20 billion was sold by third-party sellers. We estimate that this total would place Amazon roughly level with Walmart, America’s biggest apparel seller—although we note that Walmart achieves this position primarily through first-party sales while Amazon is largely transacting third-party sales.
Sprint Unlimited Basic Plan: Includes unlimited domestic calling, texting, 500MB LTE MHS, VPN & P2P & data. MHS reduced to 3G speeds after 500MB/mo. Third-party content/downloads are add’l. charge. Plan not avail. for tablets or MBB devices. Select Int’l svcs are included for phone lines. See sprint.com/globalroaming. Subsidized devices incur an add'l. $25/mo. charge.
LG V40 ThinQ offer: LG V40 ThinQ MSRP $960.00. Credits end at end of term, early termination, early payoff or upgrade, whichever occurs first. Second Year Promise full terms and conditions apply; see LGPromise.com. The Approximate Retail Value (“ARV”) is $330 ($139 gimbal, $119 micro SD card, $72 Second Year Promise. Value for the LG Second Year Promise program is an approximation based on similar service).
Amazon.com (NASDAQ:AMZN) is a fearsome competitor. No company has posted the growth that it has for so many years off such a large base. And no stock has been given so much leeway by investors. It’s remained on pretty much every list of best stocks to buy, and traded at huge valuations. That patience has allowed Amazon to trade near-term margins for long-term market share. Its reach has become so vast that it almost seems that there are no Amazon-proof stocks left.
“I think, effectively, you have a company that has conspired with about a billion consumers and technology to destroy brands,” argued Scott Galloway, a founder of business research firm now called Gartner L2 and a professor of marketing at New York University Stern School of Business, in a presentation last year. “Their attitude is that brands have, for a long time, earned an unearned price premium that screws consumers.”
2GB Plan: No discounts apply (except AutoPay discounts). Includes unlimited domestic Long Distance calling and texting. Third-party content/downloads are add’l charge. Includes selected allotment of on-network data usage for phone and mobile hotspot use and 100MB off-network data usage. Add’l on-network high-speed data allowance may be purchased at $15/GB. Mobile Hotspot Usage pulls from your data and off-network allowances. High-speed data is access to 3G/4G. Add’l $25 line/mo. applies with subsidized phone until the customer enters into a new device transaction that does not have an annual term service agreement.

The goods offered are mostly groceries, toiletries and small gifts, but this should change as Amazon gains additional local partners. You can also order food delivery from some of your favorite restaurants. For instance, in New York City, Eataly, Westside Market, Gourmet Garage, Vintage Grape Wine & Spirits and Billy's Bakery are among the participating businesses. You can opt for one-hour delivery if you're in a hurry, but that will cost you an extra $7.99. To see if your area is within Prime Now's delivery range, check the Prime Now website.

Amazon Prime  is an unheralded streaming treasure trove of some of the best movies to come out in the past couple years, though good picks can feel nearly impossible to cull cometimes from the sometimes overwhelming glut of weirdly terrible titles buried in Prime’s nether regions. Take, for example, our recent discovery of just how deep Amazon Prime’s stash of martial arts classics goes, with more than a handful of our top picks for the 100 best martial arts movies of all time. Who knows how long they’ve been there.


Just a few weeks earlier, The Capitol Forum, a Washington, D.C.-based news service that examines business and regulation, published a story arguing Amazon risked antitrust enforcement by the Trump administration for using its algorithms and platform to promote its own products over “those of merchants that are dependent on Amazon’s platform and with whom Amazon competes.”

This new $24.99 product is exactly what the name suggests: it’s a plug that goes into an outlet and is compatible with Alexa. So you can tell Alexa to turn on or turn off whatever’s plugged into the Smart Plug from wherever you are. And it supports the automatic Wi-Fi setup mentioned above. Preorders kick off today, and the $24.99 Smart Plug will be available in October.

Even though I think he's more right than wrong, the whole Internet chapter comes across as a confused old guy muttering about how he doesn't get that new fangled rock music. He complains about how many review sites there are, for instance, and has no idea how much it can transform the shopping experience (and not just be a poor supplement). Worse, the book's entire premise is mostly about how you need observational data of real customers because they'll always do things you don't expect (can't argue there), but he HAS no data on this topic, so it's just not compelling. I can't help but think the whole chapter is just in there because 'we need something about teh intertubes'.
Some of the best parts of shopping on Amazon are the wide selections and low costs, but those things can also make it difficult to root out what's really worth spending your money on before you've stretched your checkbook too thin. It can also be hard to tell which affordable options are similar (or better) in performance to their higher-priced competitors to save you some money. The huge selection and low costs can be a great advantage if you have the inside scoop needed to navigate them confidently — if not, it can be a huge drain on time scrolling through reviews and trying to parse out who means what they're saying.
Holiday shopping is not exactly stress-free. From the mad dashes on Black Friday to the last-minute running around town, it can really take a toll. This holiday season, take a deep breath, pour yourself a mug of hot apple cider, and get to work on your gift list with Amazon — you'll be done before you know it. From highly-anticipated tech and gadgets to luxe candles to trendy beauty products, the mega e-retailer has quite an expansive offering. Even better: With Amazon Prime, you can get everything on your list (and household essentials) with free two-day shipping, too. Pretty nice, right? Get ready to make this holiday season the simplest, easiest, most fuss-free one ever. And for other great gift ideas, check out Allure's other picks for presents.
Online surveys represent Internet users and, according to the Pew Research Center’s latest published data, 88% of Americans were Internet users in 2016. The proportion of the total US population using the Internet has been climbing by around two percentage points per year, according to Pew data. So, in January 2018, when we undertook our survey, it is likely that approximately 90%–91% of Americans were Internet users.

Many, if not most, of Amazon's physical goods will be shipped to your door in two days -- provided you live in the contiguous US states (sorry, Hawaiians). What's especially remarkable about this is there's no minimum order: Even if you buy a $5 HDMI cable, it'll arrive in 48 hours. In fact, residents of some ZIP codes can enjoy same-day delivery at no extra charge, so as long as the order totals at least $35.

Lease (Sprint Flex): Mo. amount excl. tax. Terms for all other customers will vary including amount due at signing & taxes/fees. Req. qualifying device & svc. plan. No equipment security deposit req. Upon completion of 18-mo. term, customer can continue to pay mo. lease amount, purch. or return device. Customer is responsible for insurance & repairs. Early termination of lease/svc.: Remaining lease pymt. will be due immed. & req. device return or pymt. of purch. option device price in lease.
Lean on Pete flows with such gentle beauty that it may be hard to grasp precisely what it’s about or where it’s going. But the power of writer-director Andrew Haigh’s sublime drama is that it can support myriad interpretations while remaining teasingly mysterious—like its main character, it’s always just a bit out of reach, constantly enticing us to look closer. Based on Willy Vlautin’s 2010 novel, the movie is a smashing introduction to Charlie Plummer, who was the kidnapped John Paul Getty III in last year’s All the Money in the World. Here, he plays Charley Thompson, a 15-year-old living with his drinking, backslapping dad (Travis Fimmel) in Portland. Charley has a sweet face and a soft-spoken manner—when he talks, the last few words evaporate into the air, as if he’s too shy to even be bold enough to enunciate—but early on, we get a sense that there’s a craftiness underneath that demeanor. The first indication is his willingness to lie about his age to Del (Steve Buscemi), a craggy horse owner who reluctantly takes him on as a caretaker for his elderly racehorse Lean on Pete. Charley doesn’t know a thing about horses, but he’s anxious to find something to do now that he’s in a new town with his father, their reasons for leaving Spokane unspecified but clearly dispiriting. Familiar narrative tropes emerge in Lean on Pete: the boy-and-his-dog drama, the coming-of-age story, the father-and-son character piece, the road movie. Haigh breezes past them all, seeking something more elliptical in this deceptively slim story. With the patience and minimalist command of a Kelly Reichardt, he doesn’t dictate where his film goes, seemingly letting Charley’s restlessness call the shots. The boy’s journey gathers force and poignancy as it moves forward, and the more we understand about Charley the more unknowable he becomes. Along the way, we meet other people and see other worlds—the life of young military veterans, the reality of homelessness, the grind of the low-rent racing circuit—but Haigh views it all with the same unassuming compassion we see in Charley’s quiet eyes. —Tim Grierson

Amazon.com Return Policy:You may return any new computer purchased from Amazon.com that is "dead on arrival," arrives in damaged condition, or is still in unopened boxes, for a full refund within 30 days of purchase. Amazon.com reserves the right to test "dead on arrival" returns and impose a customer fee equal to 15 percent of the product sales price if the customer misrepresents the condition of the product. Any returned computer that is damaged through customer misuse, is missing parts, or is in unsellable condition due to customer tampering will result in the customer being charged a higher restocking fee based on the condition of the product. Amazon.com will not accept returns of any desktop or notebook computer more than 30 days after you receive the shipment. New, used, and refurbished products purchased from Marketplace vendors are subject to the returns policy of the individual vendor.
On January 24, 2016, Amazon launched a new subscription program aimed at parents called STEM Club, which delivers educational toys to your home for $19.99 per month.[125] And by "STEM", toys will be hand-picked and focused on the area of science, technology, engineering and math.[126] The toys will range from robotics to natural sciences and will include items exclusive to Amazon.[127] STEM toy subscription club is only available in the United States.[128]
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